Award Winners

John Edward Solder

2012
First Place

Optogenetic Interrogation of Prefrontal Cortex Dopamine D1 Receptor-Containing Neurons as a Technique to Restore Timing: A Novel Approach to Treat Prefrontal Disorders

John Edward Solder

John Edward Solder

After ISEF, I went on to graduate from Yale in 2016 with a Bachelors of Science degree in Cognitive Science. My experiences through NIDA and ISEF proved invaluable as I continued performing research in neurobiology and psychopharmacology. This culminated in my thesis titled: Cognition and Histamine: H1 Receptor Modulation of Prefrontal Cortex From Fungi in the Amazon to Working Memory Function in the Rat Brain.

About the Project: 

John was able to control behavioral timing in mice that were genetically modified to activate dopamine neurons in the prefrontal cortex, a region involved in functions such as impulsivity and self-control, in response to a light stimulus. 

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Where Are They Now?

Undergraduate School: Yale University

  • Cognitive Science, Thesis: Cognition and Histamine: H1 Receptor Modulation of Prefrontal Cortex From Fungi in the Amazon to Working Memory Function in the Rat Brain

Job: Research Assistant, Yale University