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Vaping (E-Cigarettes), Nicotine, and Tobacco Toolkit

If you are interested in holding an event or educational activity that focuses primarily on vaping and the dangers of nicotine and tobacco, here are links to the newest government resources.

Did you know many vapes contain nicotine, the same highly addictive drug found in cigarettes? Vaping nicotine can change your brain and lead to addiction.
Image courtesy of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Despite some promising signs that traditional tobacco cigarette use is decreasing among teenagers, unacceptably high numbers of youth are vaping nicotine. NIDA’s 2019 Monitoring the Future Survey of eighth, 10th, and 12th graders show alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use compared to just a year ago.

Reported past month nicotine vaping among teens in 2019:

  • 1 in 10 8th graders
  • 1 in 5 10th graders
  • 1 in 4 12th graders

It is important for teens to know that most health concerns related to traditional tobacco cigarettes—addiction, lung disease, and effects on prenatal development—apply to vaping as well.

The most popular e-cigarette devices among young people resemble flash drives. Parents and teachers are often unaware their teens are using these devices because they are so small and don’t leave behind a strong smell, like tobacco cigarettes.

 

Read More About Vaping (E-Cigarettes), Nicotine, and Tobacco

Vaping devicesVaping devices.
Photo by © iStock/BackyardProduction

We must be vigilant about educating teens on the health effects of tobacco and nicotine in all forms. Some research suggests that teens using e-cigarettes are likely to start smoking tobacco within the following year, since nicotine in vaping devices is highly addictive. In addition, there have been reports of serious lung illnesses and dozens of deaths from vaping. Most of the vaping products contained THC, the ingredient in marijuana that causes the high, but some contained only nicotine. The illnesses could possibly be related to oil some manufacturers have added to the vaping liquid.

Manufacturers have added mint and other flavors to vaping pods, which have become popular among teens. However, the largest device manufacturer, JUUL, recently announced it would no longer sell mint-flavored pods in the U.S. This is in response to NIDA-funded research showing the popularity of that flavor among teens, and criticism from public health experts that it was marketing its products to teens. 

Monitoring the Future 2019: Teen Vaping Climbs Significantly: Daily vs Past Month
Monitoring the Future 2019: Teen Vaping Climbs Significantly: THC Daily vs Past Month
Monitoring the Future 2019: Teen Vaping Climbs Significantly: Teens Report Reasons for Vaping

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The Latest News

Reports of Deaths Related to Vaping

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has alerted the public to thousands of reports of serious lung illnesses associated with vaping, including dozens of deaths. They’re working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to investigate the cause of these illnesses. Many of the suspect products tested by the states or federal health officials have been identified as vaping products containing THC, the main psychotropic (mind-altering) ingredient in marijuana. Some of the patients reported vaping a mixture of THC and nicotine; and some reported vaping nicotine alone. (For more details, read this blog post.) While the CDC and FDA continue to investigate possible other contributing substances, CDC has identified a thickening agent—Vitamin E acetate—as a chemical of concern among people with e-cigarette or vaping associated lung injuries. They recommend that people should not use any product containing Vitamin E acetate, or any vaping products containing THC; particularly from informal sources like friends, family, or in-person and online dealers. They also warn against modifying any products purchased in stores, or using any vaping products bought on the street. The FDA is asking people, including health professionals, to report any adverse (negative) effects of vaping products. The CDC has posted an information page for consumers.

Resources

NOTE: All resources are from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and available online only unless otherwise indicated.

Publications

Mind Matters

Campaigns and other links

Research and Statistics

For more statistics on teen drug abuse, see NIDA’s Monitoring the Future study.

Multimedia and Interactive Resources

A toxic mix: 7,000+ chemicals in cigarette smoke, More than 70 can cause cancer, That's a recipe for disaster. Explore some of the ingredients.

Informational videos and digital media, including widgets for your website, are available through the Center for Tobacco Products Exchange Lab.

Additional Resources

Activity Ideas

Find FREE science- and standards-based classroom lessons and multimedia activities on teens and drugs – all funded or created by NIDA: Lesson Plan and Activity Finder Results: Tobacco, Nicotine, & E-Cigarettes

Additional Ideas

Classroom Activities

Become a CSI Agent
Who can sort out clues in the CSI: Web Adventures virtual game and solve the mystery first. Read More
¡BINGO PARA NDAFW!
El equipo de NDAFW se entusiasma con presentar un nuevo juego de Bingo que cualquier... Read More
Choose Your Path
Students watch NIDA's "Choose Your Path" interactive videos and vote for which "paths" to choose. Read More
 
A Listicle Tickle
Students use NIDA’s Drug Facts to create a list of 10 reasons why they should stay away from drugs. Read More
Graffiti wall
Students create a graffiti wall on poster paper with facts and myths about drugs and drug use. Read More
NDAFW BINGO!
Educate players about topics related to drug and alcohol use. Read More
 
Radio Public Service Announcement (PSA)
Students write a radio PSA about the risks of teen drug use and share it with their class or the school. Read More
Remembering Celebrities
Teens present about the life of their favorite celebrity who passed away from drug use or overdose. Read More
A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
Teens create a 1-minute video about how drug use has affected their school, community, or someone they know. Read More
 
Songwriters Competition
Have a songwriting contest based on drug facts, and offer prizes for the most creative message. Read More
Get Involved
Have students write one or more government officials about drug-use issue. Read More
 

School-wide Activities

Addiction and Art contest
Hold an art contest for students around the theme of drugs and addiction. Read More
Chat Day logo
On NDAFW Chat Day, students ask NIDA scientists questions about drugs, drug use, or addiction. (Registration is required.) Read More
Drugs: Shatter the Myths
Use our free booklets to guide a student discussion on the facts about drugs and drug use. Read More
 
Trivia Night
Teams of students answer questions from NIDA’s free “Drug Facts Challenge!” game. Read More
Dancing
Students show off their dance moves while wearing t-shirts with drug facts displayed on them. Read More
Good Morning, School!
During school announcements over the PA system, school staff state a drug fact. Read more
 
Halftime Activities
Hold creative and fun sports halftime contests—supporting your school teams while sharing drug facts. Read More
I want to SHATTER THE MYTHS because
Join NDAFW by sharing why you want to SHATTER THE MYTHS! Read More
Lunch n’ Learns
During lunch, teachers state a drug fact and a related question for students to discuss. Read More
 
Teens build a large sculpture to represent what drugs do to the brain. Read More
Meme
Students create memes using messages from the free booklet,  Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS. Read More
Peer-to-Peer Counseling
Older students meet with younger ones, explain the dangers of drug use, and coach them on how to avoid drugs. Read More
 
Rap Slam Poetry Slam
Teens write and present rap lyrics or poetry about the risks of drug use. Read More
Facebook Scavenger Hunt
Students search for clues around their school or community. They get a tip on how to find the next clue for correct answers on drug use. Read More
School Assembly
Hold an assembly where students hear directly from someone who has survived the disease of addiction. Read More
 
Sidewalk Art
Teens use chalk to write one drug Q&A from, Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS on a sidewalk, with an artistic design representing the question. Read More
Social Media
Share your NDAFW event on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or other social platforms. Read More
There's Snow Business like Show Business
Hold a talent show where teens can perform; the audience answers questions from the Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge. Read More
 
Wearing the Message
Students develop messages—or use NIDA’s free downloadable images—and put them on t-shirts. Read More
 

Activities in the Community

Bake goods
Host a bake sale to help raise money for your school or club; hand out drug facts to spread the word about the dangers of drug use. Read More
Illustration of a bike race
Organize a local bike party, and use our free logos to create t-shirts/stickers for the event. Read More
Candlelight Vigil
Hold a gathering to remember local people who have been lost to drug use. Read More
 
Concert with Local Bands
Team up with a local band, create posters or use free posters from NIDA, and hand out the booklet, Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS. Read More
Drug Awareness 5K
Organize a running or walking group and, at each mile, have people holding up signs with drug facts on them. Read More
Local Radio Call In Show
Ask local TV/radio news shows to mention drug facts during the week of NDAFW to help spread the word to prevent teen drug use. Read More
 
Poster Campaign
Young people create illustrations to showcase  the risks of drug use. You could display their art in the community. Read More
social media icons
Host a Twitter chat, Facebook Live discussion, or other online event to SHATTER THE MYTHS® about drugs and alcohol. Read More
Take it to the Streets
Teens take part in community events and hand out information about the risks of drug use. Read More
 

Need more ideas? Check out photos from past events on our Flickr page and our View Events Map page.