Teen Songwriters Honored for National Drug Facts Week

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Teen playing a guitar

As part of NIDA’s 2013 National Drug Facts Week, the GRAMMY Foundation and MusiCares selected five teens as winners of the “Teens! Make Music Contest.” Songs highlighted the dangers of drug abuse and addiction as well as the importance of making healthy choices. The Partnership at Drugfree.org also co-sponsored this year’s contest.

Vinny Cavalcanti and Nick Miller of Utah were selected first-place winners for their rap, "Psychological Cool Guy," that shows concern for a friend with a drug problem.

I've been meaning to talk to you about something for a while, about your problems with the syrup, and your problem with denial.

Second-place winners Colby Benson and Haley Michelle Kagimoto from Hawaii wrote “Change Who We’ll Become” about the pressure young people face and how to overcome the challenges.

There she goes again

She can’t run from the trouble she’s in

Her hope is running thin

She’s trying to cope with how her life has been.

Finally, in “Starting Over,” third-place winner Hannah Rand from Illinois expresses concern for a friend who uses drugs.

Don’t leave me standing here wondering if you’re okay

I don’t want to lose you this way

There’s nothing you can use that won’t end up using you

This will only hurt you in the end

So take my hand and start over again.

All the winners were given the opportunity to go backstage during a rehearsal for the 55th GRAMMY Awards show. The winners also received other cash prizes and the chance to record their music.

Listen to the winning songs and share in comments how they affect you.

Check out 2010 and 2011 contest winners.

And if you’re a songwriter or singer, watch for SBB posts about next year’s teen music contest and submit your song!

Find Help Near You

Use the SAMHSA Treatment Locator to find substance use or other mental health services in your area. If you are in an emergency situation, this toll-free, 24-hour hotline can help you get through this difficult time: call 1-800-273-TALK, or visit the Suicide Prevention Lifeline. We also have step by step guides on what to do to help yourself, a friend or a family member.

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