Sizzurp: It’s Not Cool

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Justin Bieber

In recent months, gossip magazines have reported on Justin Bieber’s erratic behavior, such as wearing a gas mask, fainting at a London concert, and traveling with a monkey. Mixed in with these reports is speculation about Bieber’s alleged use of a drug concoction called “Sizzurp.”

Bieber isn’t the only musician associated with the drink. Back in March and again at the beginning of May, rapper Lil Wayne was admitted to the hospital with seizures, allegedly from his use of Sizzurp (although he denied it).

NIDA works to stay on top of new drugs. If celebrities are involved, it’s even more important for people—especially teens—to know the facts, because sometimes people may think something’s cool just because a star does it.

Facts About Sizzurp

First, it is not cool. In fact, it’s quite dangerous. Sizzurp, also known as "Lean" and "Purple Drank," is a mixture of cough medicine—often prescription strength, containing an opioid called codeine—and soft drinks and candy for flavor. Abuse of cough medicines, especially ones that contain opioids, can cause an overdose leading to coma or even death. Less grave (but still serious) symptoms include nausea, dizziness, impaired vision, memory loss, hallucinations, and seizures like Lil Wayne experienced.

Teens may think that just because something is available from the pharmacy, it won’t harm them—but that’s not true. When not used as directed on the label, cough and cold medicines (even over-the-counter ones) can be dangerous.

Tell us in comments: If a celebrity does something, do you feel the urge to try it? What would you say to a friend who wanted to try Sizzurp?

Find Help Near You

Use the SAMHSA Treatment Locator to find substance use or other mental health services in your area. If you are in an emergency situation, this toll-free, 24-hour hotline can help you get through this difficult time: call 1-800-273-TALK, or visit the Suicide Prevention Lifeline. We also have step by step guides on what to do to help yourself, a friend or a family member.

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